Give Up! If you wanna Succeed

Success means something different to every person: like beauty, it exists in the eye of the beholder.  It is your responsibility to determine what success means for you, and how you go about breeding success in your life.

Despite this, there are definitely hindrances to success. These drawbacks are ubiquitous in their ability to deter your success. But don’t fret because if you seek success, and you fear your actions are blocking your desire for success, you have the power and control to overcome the following obstacles.

1. Making Excuses

Stop blaming other people for why you don’t get what you want. Stop refusing to accept responsibility for your mistakes. You make your own choices and you make your own mistakes.In general, stop justifying your poor choices and stop attributing your lack of success to things outside of your control. Successful people don’t do this.

You are going to err. You are going to fail. When this inevitably occurs look within, in a non-judgmental manner, and figure out what you can do better next time. Don’t waste time looking externally by creating excuses for why you didn’t achieve success.

2. Focusing on the Negatives

Yes, there are negative circumstances in life that you have no control over. There are also plenty of positive experiences in your life. I am willing to bet you have more positives in your life than negatives. You are capable of living with a positive perspective. If you want to cultivate success in your life than you need to concentrate on all the good. You shouldn’t disregard the negative, but you don’t have to give it so much of your attention. Otherwise you are never going to be satisfied because you are so focused on the unfavorable conditions of your life. Even if you reach a level of ostensible success, your continued focus on the negatives will prevent you from relishing your accomplishments.

3. Fearing Failure

As I previously stated, YOU ARE GOING TO FAIL! There is no reason to fear it. Rather, you should embrace it. Learn from it, and ultimately improve from it.

When you are successful you know you are always trying your best. When you fail it is not a reflection of you as a person; you are not a flawed individual. View failure as an opportunity to grow, not as something to be feared.

4. Looking for the Easy Way

I want to preface by stating that attaining success isn’t supposed to be an improbable venture where you have to overcome a certain amount of adversity and hardship. I am opining that successful people don’t look for the easy way through life.

Merely strolling through life on cruise control is not the blueprint for success. You need to challenge yourself at times. Push yourself and stretch your limits. Aim to reach your maximum potential, and then go beyond that. That is a success in itself.

5. Beating Yourself Up

You wouldn’t ever beat yourself up physically so why would you do it emotionally and mentally? Learning how to skillfully deal with your thoughts and emotions when you are facing adverse situations is crucial to being successful.

Get upset over things. Express your emotions in an appropriate manner. Be unhappy from time to time. It is going to happen. But don’t ruminate over unpleasant memories and beat yourself up over things that already occurred. Too much time and energy spent on this diverts your attention away from more important endeavors like progressing toward your goals.

6. Being Ungrateful

The best way to establish more contentment in your life is to be more grateful. If you want to push away happiness, joy, and bliss than be ungrateful. Gratitude breeds happiness but it also breeds success. If you are grateful for your life and everything that comprises it you are going to have a less complicated time attaining wealth and accomplishing your goals.

I don’t just mean financial wealth because wealth includes all kinds of valuables. I am not proposing that all financially wealthy people are grateful, and therefore, successful, or that all financially poor people are ungrateful, and therefore unsuccessful.

Being ungrateful is not congruent with getting ahead in life. If you crave success than observe everything you are grateful for. Your gratitude will serve as a compass for your life. It will guide your decision-making, and lead you to success.

7. Concentrating Solely on Your Needs

Hopefully this goes without saying but focusing only on yourself is not going to help you attain success. You could be the wealthiest person on the planet, and it is apparent that you are extremely successful. If you accrued your wealth by taking advantage of people, or by being selfish and egotistical, you are not successful in my book. You probably wouldn’t be very happy either. The best way to succeed in life is by helping someone else!

8. Getting Distracted

You were going to start your book but…You were going to launch your dream business idea but…You were going to travel through Asia but…
I get it. Things come up. Life takes you on a different course. It happens sometimes. But don’t allow yourself to become distracted from realizing your dreams. When distractions obstruct you from your passions than you are moving further and further away from claiming your ultimate successes.

This starts with your daily life. It is fun and often necessary to log onto Facebook and check emails, but don’t allow the modern technological age to prevent you from the work that needs to be finished today. Success is based on working toward your goals while not letting disruptions hinder that.

9. Living Aimlessly

It is your responsibility to ascertain your life goals and objectives. Being successful means you are fulfilling your life’s purpose every day.
Whether your purpose is super ambitious such as solving world hunger or more feasible like being happy, doesn’t matter. The point is that you are aiming to be the best you can be. Steadily wandering through life without any ambitions or without contributing anything to society is not what successful people do.

10. Giving Up

When you face an improbable obstacle in life how do you respond? Do you give up, or do you keep pressing on? Successful people don’t give up. They commit themselves to reaching their final destination. They may not ever get there, but they don’t allow impediments to prevent them from trying. This means continuing on despite failures and disappointments.

Success encompasses a lot of different arenas. What works for financial success may not translate into relationship success. Being successful as an athlete doesn’t necessarily make you successful as a student as well. There are varying degrees of success depending on what situation you are in.

Regardless, the fundamental backbone of success is trying your best. If you put forth your best effort, without harming others in the process, than you are a successful person. This can apply to work, family, friends, relationships, hobbies, etc. As the late great John Wooden said, “Success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming.” I think that sums it up beautifully.

Set a goal for yourself

“Time is limited. If I can make good use of it, I’ll be much more successful. So I’m going to be more productive.”

Hidden secret of Handwriting

Is really worst handwriting has a connectivity with intelligence, if no leave it. If yes, here is list of
10 legends with bad handwriting

10th place: Left-sided, mirror writing in psychology called “Leonardo’s handwriting.” Leonardo da Vinci wrote his notes just this hand, which makes them very difficult to decipher.

9th place: Napoleon changed his handwriting lifetime (he has has about seven). Over the years, Napoleon’s handwriting became confused and unintelligible. By the way, Napoleon wrote a novel. It is called “Clisson and Eugene,” and on his transcript specialists also had to sweat.
8th place: Handwriting Pushkin called “cursive”. She did not admire or penmanship teacher in high school, no contemporaries Pushkin have the handwriting was considered indecent.

7th place: small and very illegible handwriting was Nikolai Gumilev.

6th place: Lermontov often changed his handwriting, but even when he tried to write smoothly and beautiful lines always curled up, and the letters “jumped” then down, then up. In one of the books on graphology handwriting Lermontov is considered as a typical example of handwriting neurotic personality.

5th place: Manuscript Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony was published only two years after it was written. The fact that Beethoven’s favorite copyist had died, and his two successors with great difficulty assorted awful handwriting genius. In one place, correcting the error of the copyist, Beethoven wrote in a rush of feelings «du verfluchter Kerl!» («You damn fool!”).

4th place: Epistolary documents Churchill almost unreadable for those who do not have the habit of his handwriting – too small and illegible.When Churchill said once that his handwriting resembles handwriting of Cleopatra, he came to the indescribable delight.

3rd place: read some papers of Karl Marx is very difficult, because he used to write many words together.

2nd place: Einstein wrote not only unclear, but also extremely sloppy.Many of his manuscripts are blots, all sorts of stains and even fingerprints Einstein, ink-stained.

1st place: Leo Tolstoy’s handwriting was difficult to understand the confusion of symbols and additions.
Parse it could only his wife, who had countless times to rewrite the “War and Peace.” Psychiatrist Cesare Lombroso, looking at the handwriting of Leo Tolstoy came to the conclusion that it belongs to a woman of easy virtue with psychopathic tendencies.

-Prasannapugazh

Why am I afraid of fall in love?

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The story of lost love is one most of us can tell, and the question, “Why do relationships fail?” lingers heavily in the back of our minds. The answer for many of us can be found within. Whether we know it or not, most of us are afraid of really being in love. While our fears may manifest themselves in different ways or show themselves at different stages of a relationship, we all harbor defenses that we believe on some level will protect us from getting hurt. These defenses may offer us a false illusion of safety or security, but they keep us from attaining the closeness we most desire. So what drives our fears of intimacy ? What keeps us from finding and keeping the love we say we want?

1. Real love makes us feel vulnerable.
A new relationship is uncharted territory, and most of us have natural fears of the unknown. Letting ourselves fall in love means taking a real risk. We are placing a great amount of trust in another person, allowing them to affect us, which makes us feel exposed and vulnerable. Our core defenses are challenged. Any habits we’ve long had that allow us to feel self-focused or self-contained start to fall by the wayside. We tend to believe that the more we care, the more we can get hurt.

2. New love stirs up past hurts.
When we enter into a relationship, we are rarely fully aware of how we’ve been impacted by our history. The ways we were hurt in previous relationships, starting from our
childhood, have a strong influence on how we perceive the people we get close to as well as how we act in our
romantic relationships. Old, negative dynamics may make us wary of opening ourselves up to someone new. We may steer away from intimacy, because it stirs up old feelings of hurt, loss, anger or rejection. As Dr. Pat Love said in an interview with PsychAlive , “when you long for something, like love, it becomes associated with pain,” the pain you felt at not having it in the past.

3. Love challenges an old identity.
Many of us struggle with underlying feelings of being unlovable. We have trouble feeling our own value and believing anyone could really care for us. We all have a “critical inner voice ,” which acts like a cruel coach inside our heads that tells us we are worthless or undeserving of
happiness. This coach is shaped from painful childhood experiences and critical attitudes we were exposed to early in life as well as feelings our
parents had about themselves.
While these attitudes can be hurtful, over time, they have become engrained in us. As adults, we may fail to see them as an enemy, instead accepting their destructive point of view as our own. These critical thoughts or “inner voices” are often harmful and unpleasant, but they’re also comfortable in their familiarity. When another person sees us differently from our voices, loving and appreciating us, we may actually start to feel uncomfortable and defensive, as it challenges these long-held points of identification.
4. With real joy comes real pain.
Any time we fully experience true joy or feel the preciousness of life on an emotional level, we can expect to feel a great amount of sadness. Many of us shy away from the things that would make us happiest, because they also make us feel pain. The opposite is also true. We cannot selectively numb ourselves to sadness without numbing ourselves to joy. When it comes to falling in love, we may be hesitant to go “all in,” for fear of the sadness it would stir up in us.

5. Love is often unequal.
Many people I’ve talked to have expressed hesitation over getting involved with someone, because that person “likes them too much.” They worry that if they got involved with this person, their own feelings wouldn’t evolve, and the other person would wind up getting hurt or feeling rejected. The truth is that love is often imbalanced, with one person feeling more or less from moment to moment. Our feelings toward someone are an ever-changing force. In a matter of seconds, we can feel anger, irritation or even hate for a person we love. Worrying over how we will feel keeps us from seeing where our feelings would naturally go. It’s better to be open to how our feelings develop over time. Allowing worry or guilt over how we may or may not feel keeps us from getting to know someone who is expressing interest in us and may prevent us from forming a relationship that could really make us happy.

6. Relationships can break your connection to your family.
Relationships can be the ultimate symbol of growing up. They represent starting our own lives as independent, autonomous individuals. This development can also represent a parting from our family. Much like breaking from an old identity, this separation isn’t physical. It doesn’t mean literally giving up our family, but rather letting go on an emotional level – no longer feeling like a kid and differentiating from the more negative dynamics that plagued our early relationships and shaped our identity.

7. Love stirs up existential fears.
The more we have, the more we have to lose. The more someone means to us, the more afraid we are of losing that person. When we fall in love, we not only face the fear of losing our partner, but we become more aware of our mortality. Our life now holds more value and meaning, so the thought of losing it becomes more frightening. In an attempt to cover over this fear, we may focus on more superficial concerns, pick fights with our partner or, in extreme cases, completely give up the relationship. We are rarely fully aware of how we defend against these existential fears. We may even try to rationalize to ourselves a million reasons we shouldn’t be in the relationship. However, the reasons we give may have workable solutions, and what’s really driving us are those deeper fears of loss.
Most relationships bring up an onslaught of challenges. Getting to know our fears of intimacy and how they inform our behavior is an important step to having a fulfilling, long-term relationship. These fears can be masked by various justifications for why things aren’t working out—but we may be surprised to learn about all of the ways that we self-sabotage when we get close to someone else. By getting to know ourselves, we give ourselves the best chance of finding and maintaining lasting love.

-Prasannapugazh

Am gonna die

Anthony Burgess was 40 when he learned that he had only one year to live. He had a brain tumor that would kill him within a year. He know he had a battle on his hands. He was completely broke at the time, and he didn’t have anything to leave behind for his wife, Lynne, soon to be a window.

Burgess had never been a professional novelist in the past, but he always knew the potential was inside him to be a writer. So, for the sole purpose of leaving royalties behind for his wife, he put a piece of paper into a typewriter and began writing. He had no certainty that he would even be published, but he couldn’t think of anything else to do.

“It was January of 1960,” he said, “and according to the prognosis, I had a winter and spring and summer to live through, and would die with the fail of the leaf.”

In that time Burgess wrote energetically, finishing five and a half novels before the year.

Years passed but Burgess did not die. His cancer had gone into remission and then disappeared altogether. In his long and full life as a novelist, he wrote more than 70 books, but without the death sentence from cancer, he may not have written at all.

Many of us are like Anthony Burgess, hiding greatness inside, waiting for some external emergency to bring it out. Ask yourself what you’d do if you had Anthony Burgess’s original predicament. ” If I had just a year to live, how would I live differently? What exactly would I do?”

The secret behind get rid of cancer was not a mystery. The whole year he concentrated only on writing not worrying on cancer.

Just think that am gonna die next year. Rest will be history.

-Prasannapugazh

Leonardo Da Vinci’s Masterpiece: Monna Lisa

Leonardo Da Vinci’s master piece Monalisa has some untold facts. First of all, a merchant Francesco Del Giocondo requested davinci to

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paint her wife. Francesco told that he needs the painting more than the real. Davinci finally accepted to paint Lisa Gherardini. While painting lisa, davinci thought himself as a girl and made a fusion in that painting. He captured the smile from lisa but can’t able to get the sparking eyes so he handled some unexpected things. He painted the eyes without the eyebrows which makes those eyes more attractive. Moreover, Davinci painted entire portrait by his left hand. The name of the painting, Mona Lisa was the result of a spelling error! The original name of the painting was Monna Lisa. Monna in Italian is a short form of Madonna, meaning ‘My Lady’. In 1956, a man named Ugo Ungaza threw a stone at the painting. This resulted in a small patch of damaged paint next to her left elbow. The painting is.considered priceless and so it cannot be insured.
However, some people believe that Leonardo Da Vinci never completed the painting because he was a consummate perfectionist. The painting in the Louvre has a room of its own. It is protected in a climate controlled environment and encased in bullet proof glass. The room was built exclusively for the painting and it cost the museum over seven million dollars. Studies have shown that there are three different layers painted before the present version of the painting. One version has her hands clutching her arm instead of the chair in front of her.
In spite of any kind of imperfections discovered in the painting, this Renaissance art work is revered all around the world as one of the greatest masterpiece of all times.

-Prasannapugazh

Define Love

It was a busy morning, approximately 8:30 am, when an elderly gentleman, in his 80s arrived to have stitches removed from his thumb. He stated that he was in a hurry and that he had an appointment at 9:00 am. I took his vital signs, and had him take a seat, knowing it would be over an hour before someone would be able to see him. I saw him looking at his watch and decided, since I was not busy with another patient, I would evaluate his wound.
On exam it was well healed, so I talked to one of the doctors, got the needed supplies to remove his sutures and redressed his wound. While taking care of him, we began to engage in conversation. I asked him if he had a doctor’s appointment this morning, as he was in such a hurry. The gentleman told me no, that he needed to go to the nursing home to eat breakfast with his wife. I then inquired as to her health. He told me that she had been there for awhile and was a victim of Alzheimer’s Disease.
As we talked and I finished dressing his wound, I asked if she would be worried if he was a bit late. He replied that she no longer knew who he was, and hadn’t recognized him in five years. I was surprised, and asked him, “And you still go every morning, even though she doesn’t know who you are?” He smiled and patted my hand and said, “She doesn’t know me, but I still know who she is.”

-Prasannapugazh

Gandhji’s Fun Moments

The night was very dark and Mohan was frightened. He had always been afraid of ghosts. Whenever he was alone in the dark, he was afraid that a ghost lurking in some dark corner would suddenly spring on him. And tonight it was so dark that one could barely see one’s own hand. Mohan had to go from one room to another.
As he stepped out of the room, his feet seemed to turn to lead and his heart began to beat like a drum. Rambha, their old maidservant was standing by the door.
“What’s the matter, son?” she asked with a laugh.
“I am frightened, Dai,” Mohan answered.
” Frightened, child! Frightened of what?”
“See how dark it is! I’m afraid of ghosts!” Mohan whispered in a terrified voice.
Rambha patted his head affectionately and said, “Whoever heard of anyone being afraid of dark! Listen to me: Think of Rama and no ghost will dare come near you. No one will touch a hair of your head. Rama will protect you.”
Rambha’s words gave Mohan courage. Repeating the name of Rama, he left the room. And from that day, Mohan was never lonely or afraid. He believed that as long as Rama was with him, he was safe from the danger.
This faith gave Gandhiji strength throughout his life, and even when he died the name of Rama was on his lips.
Mohan was very shy. As soon as the school bell rang, he collected his books and hurried home. Other boys chatted and stopped on the way; some to play, others to eat, but Mohan always went straight home. He was afraid that the boys might stop him and make fun of him.
One day, the Inspector of Schools, Mr. Giles, came to Mohan’s school. He read out five English words to the class and asked the boys to write them down. Mohan wrote four words correctly, but he could not spell the fifth word ‘Kettle’. Seeing Mohan’s hesitation, the teacher made a sign behind the Inspector’s back that he should copy the word from his neighbour’s slate. But Mohan ignored his signs. The other boys wrote all the five words correctly; Mohan wrote only four. After the Inspector left, the teacher scolded him. “I told you to copy from your neighbour,” he said angrily. “Couldn’t you even do that correctly?”Every one laughed.
As he went home that evening, Mohan was not unhappy. He knew he had done the right thing. What made him sad was that his teacher should have asked him to cheat.
III
In South Africa Gandhiji set up an ashram at Phoenix, where he started a school for children. Gandhiji had his own ideas about how children should be taught. He disliked the examination system. In his school he wanted to teach the boys true knowledge—knowledge that would improve both their minds and their hearts.
Gandhiji had his own way of judging students. All the students in the class were asked the same question. But often Gandhiji praised the boy with low marks and scolded the one who had high marks.
This puzzled the children. When questioned on this unusual practice, Gandhiji one day explained, “I am not trying to show that Shyam is cleverer than Ram. So I don’t give marks on that basis. I want to see how far each boy has progressed, how much he has learnt. If a clever student competes with a stupid one and begins to think no end of himself, he is likely to grow dull. Sure of his own cleverness, he’ll stop working. The boy who does his best and works hard will always do well and so I praise him.”
Gandhiji kept a close watch on the boys who did well. Were they still working hard? What would they learn if their high marks filled them with conceit? Gandhiji continually stressed this to his students. If a boy who was not very clever worked hard and did well, Gandhiji was full of praise for him.
IV
This incident occurred when Gandhiji was practising law in the city of Johannesburg in South Africa. His office was three miles from his house.
One day a colleague of his, Mr. Polak, asked Gandhi’s thirteen-year old son, Manilal to fetch a book from the office. But Manilal completely forgot till Mr. Polak reminded him that evening. Gandhiji heard about it and sent for Manilal. He said, “Son, I know the night is dark and the way is long and lonely. You will have to walk nearly six miles but you gave your word to Mr. Polak. You promised to fetch his book. Go and fetch it now.”
Ba and the family were upset when they heard of Gandhi’s decision. The punishment seemed far too severe. Manilal was only a child, the night was dark and the way lonely. He had only forgotten a book after all. It could be brought the next day. This was what they all felt, but no one had the courage to say anything. They knew that once Gandhiji’s mind was made up, nobody could change it.
At last Kalyan Bhai plucked up courage. “I’ll fetch the book,” he offered. Gandhiji was gentle but firm, “But the promise was made by Manilal.””Very well, Manilal will go but let me go with him,” Kalyan Bhai pleaded. Gandhiji agreed to this and Manilal set off with Kalyan Bhai to fetch the book.
The kind and gentle Gandhiji could be firm as a rock at times. He saw that Manilal kept his word and did as he had promised.
V
Soon after Gandhi’s return from South Africa, a meeting of the Congress was held in Bombay. Kaka Saheb Kalelkar went there to help.
One day Kaka Saheb found Gandhiji anxiously searching around his desk.
“What’s the matter? What are you looking for?” Kaka Saheb asked.
“I’ve lost my pencil,” Gandhiji answered. “It was only so big.”
Kaka Saheb was upset to see Gandhiji wasting time and worrying about a little pencil. He took out his pencil and offered it to him.
“No, no, I want my own little pencil,” Gandhiji insisted like a stubborn child.
“Well, use it for the time being,” said Kaka Saheb. “I’ll find your pencil later. Don’t waste time looking for it now.”
“You don’t understand. That little pencil is very precious to me,” Gandhiji insisted.
“Natesan’s little son gave it to me in Madras. He gave it with so much love and affection. I cannot bear to lose it.”
Kaka Saheb didn’t argue any more. He joined Gandhiji in the search.
At last they found it – a tiny piece, barely two inches long. But Gandhiji was delighted to get it back. To him it was no ordinary pencil. It was the token of a child’s love and to Gandhiji a child’s love was very precious.
VI
Children loved visiting Gandhi. A little boy who was there one day, was greatly distressed to see the way Gandhiji was dressed. Such a great man yet he doesn’t even wear a shirt, he wondered.
“Why don’t you wear a kurta, Gandhi?” the little boy couldn’t help asking finally.
“Where’s the money, son?” Gandhi asked gently. “I am very poor. I can’t afford a kurta.”
The boy’s heart was filled with pity.
“My mother sews well”, he said. “She makes all my clothes. I’ll ask her to sew a Kurta for you.”
“How many Kurtas can your mother make?” Gandhiji asked.
“How many do you need?” asked the boy. “One, two, three…. she’ll make as many as you want.”
Gandhi thought for a moment. Then he said, “But I am not alone, son. It wouldn’t be right for me to be the only one to wear a kurta.”
“How many Kurtas do you need?” the boy persisted. “I’ll ask my mother to make as many as you want. Just tell me how many you need.”
“I have a very large family, son. I have forty crore brothers and sisters,” Gandhiji explained.
“Till every one of them has a kurta, how can I wear one? Tell me, can your mother make kurtas for all of them?
At this question the boy became very thoughtful. Forty crore brothers and sisters! Gandhiji was right.
Till every one of them had a kurta to wear how could he wear one himself? After all the whole nation was Gandhi’s family, and he was the head of that family. He was their friend, their companion. What use would one kurta be to him?
VII
One day Gandhi and Vallabhbhai Patel were talking in the Yeravda jail when Gandhi remarked, “At times even a dead snake can be of use.” And he related the following story to illustrate his point:
Once a snake entered the house of an old woman. The old woman was frightened and cried out for help. Hearing her, the neighbours rushed up and killed the snake. Then they returned to their homes. Instead of throwing the dead snake far away, the old woman flung it onto her roof.
Sometime later a kite flying overhead spotted the dead snake. In its beak the kite had a pearl necklace which it had picked up from somewhere. It dropped the necklace and flew away with the dead snake.
When the old woman saw a bright, shining object on her roof she pulled it down with a pole. Finding that it was a pearl necklace she danced with joy!
When Gandhi finished his story, Vallabhbhai Patel said he too had a story to tell:
One day a bania found a snake in his house. He couldn’t find anyone to kill it for him and hadn’t the courage to kill it himself. Besides, he hated killing any living creature. So he covered the snake with a pot and left it there.
As luck would have it, that night some thieves broke into the bania’s house. They entered the kitchen and saw the overturned pot. “Ah,” they thought, “the bania has hidden something valuable here.” As they lifted the pot, the snake struck. Having come with the object of stealing, they barely left with their lives.
VIII
Gandhi went from city to city, village to village collecting funds for the Charkha Sangh. During one of his tours he addressed a meeting in Orissa.
After his speech a poor old woman got up. She was bent with age, her hair was grey and her clothes were in tatters. The volunteers tried to stop her, but she fought her way to the place where Gandhi was sitting.
“I must see him,” she insisted and going up to Gandhi touched his feet.
Then from the folds of her sari she brought out a copper coin and placed it at his feet.
Gandhi picked up the copper coin and put it away carefully.
The Charkha Sangh funds were under the charge of Jamnalal Bajaj. He asked Gandhi for the coin but Gandhi refused.
“I keep cheque worth thousands of rupees for the Charkha Sangh,” Jamnalal Bajaj said laughingly “yet you won’t trust me with a copper coin.”
“This copper coin is worth much more than those thousands,” Gandhi said.
“If a man has several lakhs and he gives away a thousand or two, it doesn’t mean much. But this coin was perhaps all that the poor woman possessed. She gave me all she had. That was very generous of her. What a great sacrifice she made. That is why I value this copper coin more than a crore of rupees.”
IX
This incident occurred in Noakhali. After the Hindu-Muslim riots Gandhi toured the area on foot to reassure and comfort the people. He would set off from a village soon after dawn and arrive at the next village after sunset.
On arrival he would first attend to his work then he would take a bath. Gandhi used a rough stone to clean his feet. Miraben had given this stone to him many years ago and Gandhi had kept it carefully ever since. He took it with him everywhere.
One evening after they had arrived at a village and Manu was getting Gandhi’s bath ready, she noticed that the stone was missing. She looked everywhere but could not find it. She told Gandhi that the stone was lost and added, “It must have been left behind at the weaver’s where we stayed yesterday. What should I do now?”
Gandhi thought for a moment.
Then he said, “Go and fetch the stone. If you suffer once, you’ll not forget another time.”
“Can I take someone with me?” Manu asked. “Why?” questioned Gandhi. Manu was silent.
She did not want to admit that she was frightened to go alone.
The road to the village lay through forests of betel nut and coconut and it was easy to lose one’s way. Besides, Manu was barely sixteen years old and she had never gone anywhere alone. But she could not think of an answer. So Manu took the path they had taken earlier in the day.
Carefully following the old footprints she managed to reach the village and find the weaver’s house. The old woman who lived there recognised her and welcomed her warmly. Tired and rather irritated Manu told her why she had come.
But how was the old woman to have known that that bit of stone was so valuable? She had thrown it away with the rubbish. They both began to search for it. At last much to Manu’s joy they found it.
Manu had left the house at 7.30 in the morning. By the time she returned it was past one in the afternoon. She had walked nearly fifteen miles.
Worn out, hungry and irritated she went straight to Gandhi and put the stone in the lap.
Then she burst into tears.
“This stone was a real test for you,” Gandhi told her gently. “Do you know that this stone has been with me for the last twenty-five years. It has gone with me everywhere, from jails to mansions. I can easily get another stone like it, but I wanted you to learn that it is bad to be careless.”
“I’ve never prayed as hard as I did today,” said Manu.
“I want to make women brave and fearless”, Gandhi said. “Today not only you but I too learnt a lesson.”
Manu did not say anything but she must have thought Gandhi’s methods were very unusual.

-Prasannapugazh